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The Naughty 300 Club
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The Naughty 300 Club
by Asher B. Chancey, BaseballEvolution.com
August 7, 2009

The Naughty 300 – Players Who Have Hit 300 Homeruns in the 2000s.

Remember when 300 homeruns was an impressive career milestone? Only 124 players have ever hit 300 homeruns in their career. Amazingly, 11 of those players hit 300 homeruns in this decade alone (a number that could swell to 13). As we begin the second to last month of the last season of the naughts, here’s a look at this decade’s most prolific homerun hitters, the Naughty 300 Club.

David Ortiz (294)

That Ortiz is almost on this list is doubly ironic, since after 2000 he was on pace for 100 homeruns in the decade, and since going into 2009 he needed only 21 homeruns to get there, which would have been his lowest total since 2002.

Paul Konerko (287)

Paul Konerko currently has 287 homeruns in this decade, and needs thirteen more in the final two months of the season to get to 300. That would give the White Sox consecutive decades with a player over 300 after Frank Thomas in the 1990s.

Troy Glaus (274)

Glaus had exactly 30 career homeruns coming into the decade, and will (apparently) end the decade with 304 career homeruns. He needed 26 homeruns to hit 300 for the decade, but has missed all of 2009 with injuries.

Jason Giambi (301)

Giambi’s 10th homerun of the season was the 300th of the decade for the former MVP and admitted steroid user.

Vladimir Guerrero (304)

Vlad had exactly 300 for the decade coming into this season, which means everything he did in 2009 was going to be bonus. How could we have known he’d only have four homeruns through August 5th?

Adam Dunn (304)

The Dunner made his major league debut in 2001 and has 304 homeruns, which means that he managed to cross the 300 threshold in under nine seasons. Dunn has managed exactly 40 homeruns each of the last four years. At the age of 29, Dunn is enjoying his best season, which means 10 years from now we could be adding his name to the 600 club.

Lance Berkman (302)

Berkman very recently hit his 300th homerun of the decade, and with 4 homeruns in 1999 now has 306.

Andruw Jones (308)

I think Andruw Jones has gotten to that place where he is playing so bad we have not only forgotten everything he accomplished but we are actually suspicious of it. For a guy needed to sign a minor league deal just to make a spring training roster to have hit 308 homeruns in a decade is nothing short of shocking, but at the same time typical of the Delgado Era.

Barry Bonds (317)

I almost didn’t even check Bonds’ numbers, but then I realized, 45 homeruns per year add up fast, and 73 homeruns in one season can get you to 300 pretty quickly as well. This is a guy who missed almost all of 2005, and hasn’t played since 2007. Plus, in the 1990s, Bonds had 361 homeruns, giving him two decades with 300 or more homeruns.

Take a look at all the guys who have been busted for steroids, and compare them to Bonds, and then tell me that steroids explain away Bonds’ career accomplishments.

Carlos Delgado (324)

There is no doubt that Delgado is one of the preeminent homerun hitters of the Delgado Era. He had 320 before the season started.

Manny Ramirez (341)

Not too shabby for a guy who missed 50 games this year due to steroid suspension, phoned it in for the Red Sox for half of 2008, shut himself down after 130 games in 2006 and 2007, and only played 120 games in 2002.

Albert Pujols (355)

Like Dunn, Pujols wasn’t in the league yet in 2000. Like Dunn, Pujols is only 29 years old. With another decade of play like the one Pujols has just completed, in ten years we’ll be talking about whether Pujols is the greatest player of all time.

Jim Thome (363)

This guy is the Harmon Killebrew of our time. An elite basher who never got to play in a primo baseball market. 363 is a bewildering one decade total.

Alex Rodriguez (424)

Check out this guy’s line for the decade – 424 homeruns, 1203 RBI, 1158 runs, 3265 total bases. This guy had a Hall of Fame career in ten years.

Notes

- We note above that Alex Rodriguez has managed 424 homeruns in this decade. Only 44 players have ever hit 400 homeruns in a career. Of those 44, only A-Rod, Babe Ruth (467 in the 1920s), and Mark McGwire (405 in the 1990s) have managed that feat in one decade. Harmon Killebrew missed by seven homeruns in the 1960s, a pretty impressive feat considering he played only 124 games in 1960, 113 games in 1965, and 100 games in 1968.

- Consider, as well, that McGwire hit 405 homeruns in the 1990s despite missing 340 games from 1993 to 1996.

- By the way, we noted above that Barry Bonds hit 300 homeruns in two different decades. Since that produces at least 600 homeruns, at this moment there are only six players all time who even have enough homeruns to even have pulled off 300 homeruns in two different decades. And even among those six players, Bonds is the only one ever to have done it. Of the others, Sammy Sosa did it in the 1990s, but missed too much time in the naughts; Ken Griffey, Jr. did it in the 1990s and then had a disastrous naughts; Willie Mays did it in the 1960s only; Babe Ruth did it in the 1920s, but didn’t play nearly all of the 1910s or the 1930s; and Hank Aaron’s career spanned only half of the 1950s and half of the 1970s, so he only got the 1960s as well.





Questions? Concerns? Comments? Asher lives in Philadelphia, PA, and can be reached at asher@baseballevolution.com.

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